IT SHOULD WORRY YOU THAT THE FDA TOOK LONGER TO APPROVE GMO SALMON THAN IT DID ASPARTAME

An recent article written in the Wall Street Journal regarding Intrexon Corporation -- a little known company that invested hundreds of millions of dollars to create GMO diamond moths, GMO apples that don't turn brown, cloned kittens and the dreaded GMO franken-salmon, came clean about how long it took to gain FDA approval for sale.

"It took the FDA twenty years to approve GMO salmon -- that's two years longer than it took the FDA under intense pressure from Donald Rumsfeld, to approve aspartame -- after the FDA recommended it not be approved after investigations of brain tumors in animals. 

As owner of AquaBounty Technologies, a Massachusetts firm developing a farm-raised Atlantic salmon enhanced with a gene from the Chinook salmon, to produce a fatter variety that grows twice as fast as wild or current farm versions, Intrexon got the green light from the FDA after nearly twenty years in review.

While it may seem comforting to some that the FDA took it's sweet time to approve Franken-salmon, it sounds fishy to others that similar to the hasty roll-out of aspartame, Franken-salmon would hit the market so quickly once the decision was handed down.

Timelines reveal that the FDA took eighteen years to approve aspartame, knowing it wasn't fit for human consumption. While we may not know for many years how the decision to approve GMO Salmon unfolded, or how it will affect humans, it makes one wonder what pending issues the FDA has held back on. One that we know of is concerns over the GMO franken-salmon getting into the wild salmon population where they might compete with — or interbreed with — wild salmon. 

Another little known reason for the release GMO salmon may be the less publicized issue of radiation poisoning in the Pacific Ocean stemming from the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster in June of 2012.

Will the issue of why the FDA approved Franken-salmon remain dead in the water? Not likely, but one thing is certain-- consumers and many supermarket chains don't want it anything to do with it and that's not likely to change anytime soon.